Hey, Google, Weren’t Happy with Congress? Well, Meet ACORN!

New Orleans    Recent years have been abundantly kind for those in big tech, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Microsoft, and the like. Money flowing like water. Arrogance and pomposity unchallenged by empty slogans disguised behind corporate speak claiming interest in the common good. Recently they have had some harder days testifying before Congressional committees and bipartisan approbation over their clueless handling of Russian manipulation during the 2016 election and their tepid and dilatory response to the problems. Heaven forbid, rather than simply collecting contributions and dining with tech lobbyists, they may actually suggest some regulations, nothing too big mind you, but maybe identifying who paid for political ads, similar to the requirements for newspaper and television ads. No holding your breath now, we may need you later, but we’ll see.

If Google representatives thought their shoes were too tight in Washington, DC, they got an even ruder awakening in Toronto recently as they began their charm offensive with their subsidiary, Sidewalk Labs, recently winning a big contract to develop a huge piece of prime real estate with promises of creating a so-called “city of the future” with endless geehaws and high-tech bells and whistles. Or as a summary description from the Canadian Broadcast Corporation reported,

Sidewalk’s vision for the site focuses on improving energy use, housing affordability and transportation. A 189-page document detailing some options includes the use of self-driving shuttles, buildings that are cheap to build (potentially even made of timber) and easy to modify, and a “people-centred” streetscape that’s dominated by bike paths and walkways.”

As discussed previously, the Google tone deaf notion of housing “affordability” is using tech tools to reduce the cost of construction. As they used to say on the oil fields when I worked there, “that’s engineers for you,” and the same seems true for the tech types.

But, ACORN gave Google a special Toronto welcome as reported by the CBC:

ACORN calls for plans to address housing ‘crisis’

Before the doors opened, anti-poverty activists with ACORN rallied outside, demanding the project focus on “deep affordability.”

“We are in a crisis in the city, a housing crisis,” said Alejandra Ruiz Vargas.

She says the group hasn’t been consulted on the project so far, and only received an invite to Waterfront Toronto’s sold-out event the day before. She also questions how a Silicon Valley spinoff defines affordable housing.

“What is affordable for rich people?” she said.

Inside the venue, Doctoroff highlighted affordable housing developments built in New York City when he was the deputy mayor (an appointed position under former Mayor Michael Bloomberg.) He also praised Ruiz Vargas for taking a stand, telling her: “I just want you to know how much we respect that.”

However, others also questioned Sidewalk’s commitment to affordability, with one noting some of New York’s failings and also another pointing out that Toronto already has housing and poverty reduction plans.

“Welcome to Toronto, the city of many strategies and very little money,” she told Doctoroff.

Google is trying to put sugar in our coffee already, but it will take a lot more than some sugar and respect to satisfy ACORN and its members – and people throughout Toronto. These “consultations” won’t be a quick cup of coffee, but concerted negotiations with real demands. Or as ACORN leader, Alejandra Ruiz Vargas, said, “Welcome to Toronto.”

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