Good Political Parties are Good Community Organizations

dscn1993

volunteers making calls at night for the health care campaign

Amersfoort   Being embedded in the offices of the Socialist Party of the Netherlands for several days to help on the field programs involving their campaign to reform the private insurance-based health care system in their country, I have been able to sit in on a number of meetings with local chapter activists, leaders, and volunteers. After all of these days a lesson emerges that is surprising, but should not be: good political parties are good community organizations, and good community organizations create strong local parties. It seems simple to say that, but the task of getting it right is very difficult and complex.

There are forty different political parties in the Holland of all shapes and sizes. The Liberals are not liberal, but conservative. Labor is not all of labor. There is a Green Left Party which is building itself around social media. There is an Animal Party which is largely environmental. You get the picture. Interestingly, the health care reform effort initiated by the Socialists as a nonpartisan, national campaign has the support of many of these parties, even if not total agreement on each plank of the reform platform, along with a number of labor unions as well. 200,000 people have responded to the campaign at this point, and 75000 have asked for toolkits allowing them to take action and recruit more supporters. Just like any good, national organization, this is good, solid basic organizing where they have constructed a campaign around an issue with deep, broad-based support in order to win reform certainly, but also assuredly to build their party organization. That turns out to not be a simple task because of various privacy and database sharing restrictions in the Netherlands, but increasingly the glow from a popular and aggressive campaign is lighting the path to building a stronger party as well.

As interestingly to me have been the stories that lie at the infrastructure of strong local party chapters, because they are almost invariably stories of strong local campaigns. Chapter leaders from Utrecht, one of the largest Dutch cities, met the field and educational team for several hours. They told of having identified a particular neighborhood where they had little organization historically, but usually a solid vote. They wanted to build an organizing committee and door knock the area to build support. They even created a rudimentary application for smartphones with or without internet as a tool to use on the doors with pre-loaded addresses and a way to upload in the field or on a home computer the results of the visits as well as a ranking system from “a to e” to classify interest and support of their organization. The committee and the door knocking process turned up an issue around housing improvements that was compelling for many people. All of this is good, solid, basic community organizing. They had built a pool of 30 people who were willing to door knock and could reliably pull out 15 or so to do the work. This committee was largely from outside of the community and they did not ask people to join, so there were differences, but when they told of winning a housing issue that delivered a victory for about 240 families, it wasn’t so different from the best stories ACORN community groups would tell. When they did get around to asking for support in the form of selling a local newspaper, 90% of the folks were glad to pitch in a euro to do so.

They weren’t alone. Another chapter in a smaller city in the south won a local, neighborhood issue in a area with many elderly families. In a small suburb of Amsterdam, attendance at a local meeting soared to 200 on a national program where even the largest chapters were only pulling 80 to 120. The secret was no secret to any community organizer. They had knocked on the doors.

Historically, political parties were built like grassroots, community organizations. Where party members who are volunteers are still willing and motivated to do the work, that’s how strong local organizations are still built. The result is infectious and leads to things like a national healthcare reform campaign. It’s nice to be reminded that this is how politics can still work from the bottom up, since we witness too many campaigns, like the current one in the United States where everything is from the top down and local organization is mostly rumor and rarely fact.

dscn1994

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Organizing Props Matter in a Campaign

organizers for Netherlands national health care reform campaign against "own risk" admire their crowd magnet

organizers for Netherlands national health care reform campaign against “own risk” admire their crowd magnet

Amersfoort, Netherlands   We were meeting with the organizing team for the national healthcare campaign in Holland. The campaign has hit a deep nerve in trying to push private insurers back out of the market place and arguing that there is not a national healthcare system when huge numbers are not participating because of an “own risk” system requiring significant additional payments that are preventing people from using health insurance. Suddenly, someone opened the door of the conference room, and announced that the truck was here. In no time, any other business was deferred, as we all went down to the driveway behind the building to see the truck.

Being old school, I assumed we were all being dragooned down to help unload boxes of some sort or another from a delivery truck, but not this time. Instead we were greeted by a giant campaign prop. This was something else!

one of the organizers takes a punch at "own risk"

one of the organizers takes a punch at “own risk”

The truck was painted in the rainbow colors of the campaign with the cross signifying the health care fight. There were huge metallic letters fabricated over the bed of the old truck, an Opal Blitz, with theater lights spelling out Eigen Risico or Own Risk. When the designers started pulling stuff off the truck, I quickly realized that we hadn’t seen the half of it yet. Two more pieces were manhandled off of the truck. Once it was placed upright, it became clear it was a punching bag like one you would find at a state fair. But this one was rigged to a computer which made it much different. The operator would type your name into a computer. An IPad would spell out that “Nils is Hitting Own Risk.” When Nils took his swing, the lights began flashing on the truck spelling out the words Own Risk again, very dramatically. Meanwhile there was a camera mount aligned to the overhand bag, so that when Nils or anyone else laid a roundhouse on the bag it also took a picture. There was router and wireless connections behind the IPad structure which caught the picture matched it with the address and sent an attachment of the picture to the swinger’s email. Within minutes, Nils had an email that was a short video of him hitting the punching bag and an explosion of colors coming out.

the truck is something else

the truck is something else

What an intricate campaign prop. One of the designers told me it only took two weeks to build the contraption, as it was a lot more than that just “thinking it through.” Talk about bells and whistles. Old school carney act comes to the digital world!

If you want to win a campaign, it helps to have props for actions and rallies, and here’s one that it is easy to imagine is going to be a hit when members are working marketplaces trying to get the word out to friends and neighbors.

This was pretty much one that it is safe to say most of us “couldn’t do this at home,” but as something advancing a campaign and creating a happening in town after town, this bad boy is going to be hard to beat.

campaigners debate campaign colors and clothing

campaigners debate campaign colors and clothing

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