Private Equity Sabotaging Working Communities

lone-star-foreclosures

the map is a few years old

Madison   Auction off tens of thousands of homes during the housing crisis to private equity companies without rules or wherefores other than to offload the problems, despite knowing that private equity operations only care about their bottom line, what could go wrong? Not surprisingly, it turns out, just about everything, and nowhere is this truer than when the private equity bunch is led by Lone Star and the robber baron of our time, John Grayken, the American-born pirate who renounced his citizenship in order to pay less taxes, and now pretends to live in Ireland.

The New York Times is finally taking a look at the disaster that has followed the government’s policy of cut-and-run on the housing crisis and found the biggest culprits were Lone Star and its servicer, Caliber, Nationstar, also with Texas roots, and of course Blackstone, which has come out of this bottom feeding crisis as the largest private landlord in the country. Private equity firms are money machines and make it clear that if they make more money foreclosing, they won’t hesitate. Most hardly participated in the HAMP, housing modification program, to try to allow families to keep their homes, and because the government turned the whole modification process over to banks and financiers, there was no requirement that they do so.

Neither of course was there any obligation under the Community Reinvestment Act to benefit lower income, racially diverse communities and not discriminate in lending. As the Times reports:

But much of this investment has not benefited poor neighborhoods. Banks are expected, under the Community Reinvestment Act, to help meet the credit needs of low-income neighborhoods in areas they serve. Private equity has no such obligation. The idea is that banks should follow an implicit social contract: In return for government loans and other support, they are expected to serve a community’s needs. Private equity, which unlike the banks does not borrow money from the government, is answerable to its investors. Those investors include some of the nation’s largest pension plans, whose members — teachers and police officers among them — may support improvements to such lower-income areas.

And, that’s putting it mildly.

Private equity makes no bones about any of this either.

 

Lone Star explains to investors one way it profits from delinquent loans. Lone Star’s mortgage subsidiary will lower a borrower’s monthly payment if “the net present value of a modification is greater than the net present value of a foreclosure, loan sale or short sale.” Translation: If foreclosing on a homeowner is the most profitable option, Lone Star is likely to foreclose.

Not surprisingly, the new bosses for the housing market are much like the old bosses, except worse. Paperwork is misplaced or disappears. Homeowners can’t get responses or assistance. Modifications come too late to prevent foreclosures, and the beat goes on.

Pretty simply when you turn over the chicken house to the fox, you don’t just have a problem, you have no chickens, and in this case all of us, especially in low-and-moderate income communities are the chickens, clucking all the way to the slaughter.

Think I’m exaggerating? Here’s a perfect example from the Times on the vicious circle of predatory exploitation that Nationstar is able to practice directly and through its subsidiaries:

The whirl of transactions illustrates how Nationstar can control nearly every stage of the mortgage process, posing potential conflicts of interest as it earns fees along the way. Nationstar collects bills and, when people don’t pay, can foreclose on homes. Nationstar earns fees auctioning those homes through Homesearch. Ads on Homesearch, which is now known online as Xome.com, direct bidders to Greenlight. Nationstar can then collect on the new mortgage, bringing the process full circle.

As banks have pulled out of housing and private equity has swooped in, low and moderate communities are also being starved of needed investment, which also feeds into yet another cycle or deteriorating conditions for our communities. What’s the government doing about all of this? Not much. There’s talk of some new regulations by HUD, but who knows at this point, that may be too little and it’s definitely too late. Some Congressmen are moaning about their folks and foreclosures, but most of this is wishing-and-a-hoping. Looks like we’re headed for the wall again, unless there’s big change in the relationships between Washington and Wall Street, and that’s not looking so good this minute either.

Source: The New York Times

Source: The New York Times

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Has Community Reinvestment Become the Ghetto of the Banking Industry?

12.12.12-HousesNew Orleans   Since the financial crisis many of us who believe in decent and affordable housing have spent time making sure the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) didn’t become the goat for the financial meltdown and banking scandals. And, don’t get me wrong, that’s important!

In a 2015 Federal Reserve study the conclusion was clear: CRA was blameless. Only 6% of loans by banks in CRA-qualified census tracks would have qualified as high risk. The repayment rate for CRA-based loans was equal or better than other loans in banking portfolios.

Nonetheless recently I finally felt like I might have stumbled on a disturbing pattern when I started thinking about the array of CRA officers populating various banks and I then started to worry that there might be another side to the CRA story that needs attention, and that’s whether or not it has become a banking ghetto populated more by politicians and promises than real efforts to move families into housing and desperately needed resources and loans into lower income communities.

For example, the National Community Reinvestment Coalition claims that approximately $4 trillion in CRA commitments was promised between 1997 and 2005. And, that’s good news and ACORN’s experience was that much of it was delivered on our agreements, as I detailed in my 2009 book, Citizen Wealth. On the other hand the word “promised,” when it comes to minority lending and lower income communities always makes you wonder. The Federal Reserve report for example quoted testimony given by JPMorgan Chase to the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission that “less than one-fourth of the loans pledged in the largest-ever CRA commitment ($800 billion by JPMorgan Chase) were to the lower-income borrowers and neighborhoods targeted by the CRA.” When forced to fess up, Chase essentially was admitting that their pledge was a scam. They also quoted a “Citigroup managing director… that most CRA commitments ‘would have been fulfilled in the normal course of business.’” Having dealt with Citigroup for years, that’s simply a lie. Nonetheless, it’s worrisome that these big hitters in the CRA lending world are essentially saying they were playing all of us for fools. Admittedly, they were also trying to save their skins before the Commission, but I’m afraid the truth may also have been slipping out.

And, then there’s a pattern I started to wonder about when thinking about the CRA officers we run into from bank to bank these days. There’s a high incidence of what seem to be political appointees rather than real bankers who might be able to move money rather than simply bring calm to stormy seas. On the local scene just to think about a random selection, there were several current African-American legislators still in office, a relative of a former Mayor, and a social friend of the CEO…are you starting to see the picture? Nationally, I remember dealing with an African-American former mayor of Minneapolis and the scion of a long standing black political powerhouse family from Buffalo.

Maybe we need some solid research of our own on whether or not big and little banking is really committed to CRA objectives and non-discriminatory lending in minority and lower income communities, or whether or not we’re being played by politicians in banker’s suits making promises while continuing to grip the money with an ever tightening fist?

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