Secrets? Who Has Secrets Anymore?

yahoohackLittle Rock   If you ever want to keep a secret, don’t ever write it down anywhere. Don’t walk, but run away the internet! That’s increasingly the single biggest clue to protecting your privacy.

The evidence mounts daily as the tidal surges of data seep out of every conceivable internet portal and stream into hands both nefarious and purposeful. Let’s look at some cases in point.

  • WikiLeaks has to be in the conversation, but someone has to explain Julian Assange to me these days. Is he about transparency or anarchy? Is he serving a greater cause or an agent of the KGB? The fact that we’re scratching our heads, means there is a big warning sign attached to anything with a WikiLeaks label these days.
  • Yahoo had all of the critical data lifted from a half-million customers in the latest and largest hackfest, including social security numbers and the whole enchilada. The biggest concern in the papers was whether it would lower Yahoo’s sale price to the telecoms.
  • The FBI arrested someone in August who had lifted the source code for hacking into foreign government websites (and just maybe we should discuss that sometime, too!), but now they aren’t clear if he was a Snowden wannabe or a hoarder who couldn’t keep himself from taking stuff home. Booz Allen has made billions subcontracting to NSA and other agencies for this kind of spy craft, but seems to be running a Swiss cheese factory.
  • Yahoo seems to have answered a secret subpoena from the government and created a scanner for its email to try and isolate messages for an alleged terrorist the G-men were tracking.

The list is endless: Apple, one bank after another, credit companies, department stores, hotels, and on and on. Pretty much if you operate in the modern economy, your data is eventually going to end up everywhere, partly because it cost money for companies to protect it, and they would rather apologize for the breech and say, “it’s happening to everyone,” rather than provide the security they are implicitly promising whenever you turn over your information.

No worries, you could go with encryption right?

Not if you follow what is happening to Open Whisper, reputedly the best encryption site out there developed by Mr. Encryption, Moxie Marlinspike, an eccentric, genius hacker and programmer. The government has secretly subpoenaed his company for information. We know this because the ACLU has won some court proceedings trying to protect Marlinspike and his operation. Nonetheless the government is still after Open Whisper because they are trying to collect information that the company expressly says that it does NOT collect.

We’re living in a catch-22 world now. We can’t live with the internet, but we can’t live without it. At this point we need to come to grips with the fact that unless we’re hand signaling to someone out in the wilderness somewhere, no secret is safe, and of course even while our lips might be moving and our hands waving, an eye in the sky probably has our GPS coordinates handy and some footage available.

Our lives are an open book. Get used to it!

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Please enjoy Suzanne Vega’s We of Me. Thanks to KABF.

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Establishing Internet as a Utility – This is Big!

internet-logos-1024x643Quito   In the midst of so much tragedy at the massacre of almost 50 LGBT men and women at a nightclub in Orlando and the horror and insensitivity of the Trump and Republican response, it was still possible to find a bright spot in the news: a federal court has backed policies establishing the internet as a utility.

It was not just any court either, it was the highly influential United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, one of the most prestigious in the country. By a 2-1 vote on the panel, the judges in an 184-page decision came down solidly with the people rather than the industry by holding that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rightly can regulate the internet and assure net neutrality, because in fact the internet is not a luxury good, subject to special pricing and plundering by cable companies, but a utility, necessary for all the people.

This doesn’t close the door. There will likely be an appeal of course to the Supreme Court, but it opens many doors that might include more expansive rulings by the FCC that the internet is not only a utility, as a vital communication and consumer tool, but a public good that should be regulated accordingly and done so aggressively.

At one level this is something we all knew. Applying for jobs, getting through school, applying for many public benefits for the poor, keeping up with friends, and even the news of the nation, is increasingly impossible without the internet. The federal government’s investment in recent years to extend access to the internet to more rural areas and to public schools and libraries was evidence of this, even while being a subsidy for private carriers.

Interestingly, there are signs that the recognition of the public utility nature of the internet may be trickling down. On the one hand the FCC is talking about loosening the restraints that private internet providers have managed to lobby through many state legislatures to block municipalities from establishing their own systems to insure that all their citizens have affordable, high speed access. On the other, I got a press release the other day that the Ouachita rural electric cooperative in southern Arkansas of all places had partnered with an outfit so that it could extend internet services to 9000 families lacking access in the footprint of the cooperative. That would be a nice idea to catch on fire with other cooperatives that are sitting on money and unclear what to do with it other than pay their directors.

So, sure, we all hate utility companies and there have been thousands of campaigns to try and get them to be more accountable, provide better service, and affordable or lifeline rates, but if there’s one thing we’ve learned to hate even more than the local telephone, gas, or electric company, it’s the profiteering cable companies. With this decision we can hope their time in the sun and at the trough is finally coming to an end, so that all the people can access and afford the internet, because it’s a utility operating as a public good and necessity as well.

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