Category Archives: Coffee

Unfair Fairtrade

 New Orleans               ACORN International released a hard-hitting report that was the result of extensive research during the summer, largely conducted by Melanie Craxton, an economics major at the University of Edinburg, interning in the New Orleans headquarters.   Because of our partnership with COMUCAP, the women’s coffee and aloe vera growing cooperative in Marcala, Honduras, and our new relationship with Fair Grinds Coffeehouse (www.fairgrinds.com), the oldest fair-trade only establishment in New Orleans, which has made support of ACORN International’s Central and South American organizing a major priority, we have become increasingly knowledgeable of the curious and contradictory world of fair trade certification by the global agency formed for this purpose, Fairtrade (FLO), based in Germany.

The report, “Unfair Fairtrade,” was released yesterday on the ACORN International website (www.acorninternational.org) and asks some tough questions about the contradictions and inconsistencies involved in the Fairtrade organization.  The mission and purpose of Fairtrade were exemplary.  Founders came together to unite cooperatives of developing world producers in a process that would yield them a better market price for their crops by allowing consumers to know that common standards and guarantees existed.

Over the years though the costs have grown and in many cases neither consumers nor producers seem to have ended up where either one of them hoped to be in these transactions.  ACORN International in a meeting last summer with the best of the national Fairtrade affiliates in Canada found that our own partners, COMUCAP, both could become the first or one of the first aloe vera certified organizations and were somehow suspended.  In the burgeoning bureaucracy that many now believe characterizes, the Fairtrade organization, even with the intervention of our Canadian friends, COMUCAP has been stuck in this stalemate status, likely because of delay in paying the significant fees required to maintain their status.  Is their coffee somehow less fair trade now?  Less organic?  Are the members of the cooperative less dependent on the sales through COMUCAP?  The answer is “no,” to all of those questions, but stuck they remain.  Our research found that they are not alone, and in fact this is a common problem. Continue reading

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Fox News Crosses Line with Home Address and Number

343_cartoon_fox_news_acorn_small_overNew Orleans I ran home for a minute  yesterday to pick up a sweater after the rain brought a cool front into New Orleans.  The phone rang.  I picked it up, there was silence and then the caller disconnected.  I figured it was a bad robo-dial.  A minute later there was another call.  The caller asked if this was Wade Rathke, I asked who wanted to know, and the man said he was Mark Sutherland, a “big supporter” of mine and admirer of my work and what ACORN had accomplished, but he wanted me to know that “Mark Sinclair” from Fox News, was broadcasting my home address, my home phone number, and the phone number of the Fair Grinds Coffeehouse that we began managing in mid-October.  I thanked him, and hung up.

The next half-hour of messing with this was interesting.  First, there were not a huge number of callers, which at least proves that some Fox News viewers have some good sense or a modicum of manners.  Secondly, most callers hung up as soon as I picked up the phone on the old principle I suppose that if a man answers, hang up!  I think they were taken aback to have gotten lucky and had me on the phone.  One engaged me a bit and wanted to make sure I was “Wade S. Rathke, the ACORN thug who was organizing the Occupy movement.”  I told him my middle name was Wade and that he had his “S” was in the wrong place, and I hung up.  The calls were from Allentown, PA, and central Jersey, and that neck of the woods.  Fox News and these losers probably don’t realize that you can immediately dial back after a call and get the number of the caller on modern phones, so we could collect their numbers to turn into the police.

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