Discovering Precarious Work and “Hotel Mama”

fast-food-strike-AP46472623_620x350Charlotte         Is it just me or is the mainstream starting to discover precarious employment?   Maybe it’s the “fight for $15” push that’s opening eyes?  Maybe it’s a residue of the Occupy 1% theme?  Maybe it’s the yawning gap between the rich and the rest of us?  I’m not sure, but I know two things.  One, that, like spring, tales of the precarious are starting to sprout up everywhere, and, secondly, that it has to be a good thing, no matter how odd some of the pieces come out.  None of this is George Orwell down and out in London and Paris, but most of it is more a long look through a telescope at Mars full of observations with very limited, well gloved participation at most.

The New York Times of course has the occasional story of a fast food worker trying to live and raise a family on barely minimum wage, but that’s hardly new.   Recently though, The New Yorker ran a story by William Finnegan, their esteemed reporter on all things south of the US border, where he followed an informal mineworker – one of an estimated 400,000 — in the gold fields of Peru at 17,000 feet who tried to make a hardscrabble living as his fuse burned to an early death.  Elsewhere in the magazine for the life of me it almost seemed that the reader was being encouraged towards at least a glimmer of empathy for Somalian pirates because of the dire economics and precarious prospects for making a living in that failed state.  Interestingly, the business end of piracy seems to be small time, marginal workers hardly a half-step above precarious making “investments” in the success of the ransom demands.  Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not recommending this for marginally employed workers, but the New Yorker’s door opening for their readers into the other worlds of work outside Manhattan is truly fascinating!

The Economist recently expressed concern for the increasingly precarious situation for Japan’s working poor where even with almost full employment, defined at 4% or less, a record-level 16% of the population is now living on less than half the national median income.  Bestsellers are being written in this orderly society on how to live on less than $16700 per year.  American low-wage workers would love to read some books with valuable advice there!   The bottom line is irregular employment.  The Economist noted that “the number of irregular workers – often earning less than half the pay of their full-time counterparts with permanent employment contracts – has jumped to over 1.5 million.  Casual and part-time employees number nearly 20 million, almost 40% of the Japanese workforce.”

Many reports are now wondering, “How are people living like this?”

In Japan, many, especially younger workers, are living at home with parents as their primary housing and welfare agency.  That’s not unusual it seems.   Precarious employment is forcing huge numbers of younger workers around the world into what is being called “Hotel Mama” in Eastern Europe.  In the US 15% of adults 25 to 34 live with their parents.  In Slovakia 74% between 18 and 34 and 57% between 25 and 34, in Bulgaria 51%, Romania 46%, Serbia 54%, and Croatia 59%.

As more and more observers discover the ubiquitous nature of informal employment as if this is a new exploration into a previously unknown world, it’s a good thing, though I have to wonder how they avoided it so long.  Unfortunately, the observations decoupled from participation, still seem woefully short on solutions or even recommendations, even as the recognition of the growing crisis increases.

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