Ontario, Canada is Populist Battleground in Coming Elections

Toronto     The late Rob Ford gave steady and staid Toronto an international profile as mayor that wasn’t at the top of the local tourist board’s wish list.  He had ridden into office on a wave of populist discontent from the outer, working and middle-income districts of the city of Toronto, and he rode out on scandals involving not only his pronouncements and policies, some of which were acceptable to ACORN Canada, but also on his stays in drug rehab and videos of him buying crack on the streets, while mayor.  His excuse is a political classic.  He simply shrugged and said he “was hammered.”  His most consistent defender was his brother, an elected member of the Toronto city council at that time.

Now, it’s brother, Doug Ford who has them shaking in their snow boots with his upset win as leader for the Progressive Conservatives (whatever that oxymoron means as a name for a political party) making him a surprise, dark horse candidate for Premier of Ontario, the Canadian province containing more than a quarter of the country’s population as well as the cosmopolitan city of Toronto.  Pundits and opponents are quickly trying to brand Ford as the “Trump of the North,” and though the comparison is not exact, there are some likely similarities.   He has raised the question of revisiting abortion laws for example and his positions on climate change are questionable, but he is no Trump when it comes to immigrants and immigration, enjoying strong support in his races from the recently arrived, known as “new” Canadians in the north.  Observers believe his success in the party primary indicates that he may be able to tap into the feelings of anger and alienation in deindustrialized sections of Ontario where factories have closed and jobs have disappeared.  His record on issues effecting suburban women would not make him their first choice though nor would his tendency to move political closer to the bullying part of the spectrum.  Whatever might be the case, at the least his name on the list guarantees a very different election in the coming months.

The race is set to determine whether the longstanding government of the Liberals will be allowed to continue.  Polls indicate that there is a lot of voter fatigue with their government, although the current premier had been trying to recast herself as a candidate of change, Ford’s presence in the race is likely to disrupt that strategy.  Whether the more progressive, minority New Democrats can take advantage is also an open question.

The Ontario election seems to be worth following as part of the global contest over populism.  There is no question the election is shaping up as perhaps the least Canadian in terms of classic norms and sensibilities that has been seen in the great north in many decades.


Please enjoy Led Zeppelin’s Immigration Song.

And celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Otis Redding’s Sittin On the Dock of the Bay.

Thanks to KABF.


Confusion Reigns Over Brexit and Immigration Affects All EU Politics

Little Rock   Over and over again I would ask members, organizers, activists and others, “What’s the skinny on Brexit? What’s it going to mean to us and our people?”  The answer was almost invariably a shrug and one of those looks that says, “who the heck knows?”

That’s not to say there aren’t a lot of opinions about different directions it might go and the responses many might take.  The Scottish National Party claims that they would revive their push for independence for Scotland if Brexit isn’t to their liking.  Right now, the independence effort is off the radar.  The Labour Party is letting the governing Conservative Party wallow in their own mess.  UKIP is a threat without being a real danger.   But, still no one knows what will happen to jobs and what will happen to immigration and everything connected to both of these front-page issues.

Theresa May, the Prime Minister who is still barely holding on, because no one wants this mess on their shoes, keeps backtracking on one demand after another.  She’s now agreed to pay more than a billion in old bills.  She’s guaranteed that EU residents that are living and working in the UK will be able to stay, regardless of Brexit, though the doors will undoubtedly be closing more tightly with Brexit.

Immigration continues to be the stick stirring the drink all over Europe, and an issue that the EU talks big about everyone handling their share of the weight on refugees, but there’s no enforcement, just a lot of shame-and-blame.  Meanwhile Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and right wing or so-called populist parties in France, Italy, and elsewhere are still making mischief and division over the issue.

More people cared about Wetherspoon’s being out of food and grocery stores being out of eggs and bread, than Brexit.  This looks like a continuing mess of rare proportions.