The Sweet Sounds of the Street in the Mexican Pueblo

Puerto Aventuras   Ok, I’ve fretted about hawkers on some of the world’s most famous archeological sites in Mexico, the current and coming crisis around water for the burgeoning local – and tourist – population draining the Yucatan Peninsula dry, and the socio-spatial apartheid exclusion of Mexicans from their legally entitled access to beaches on the Mayan Riviera at the hands of industrial tourism, so why are we enjoying our time in Mexico and especially in this small pueblo so much? You simply have to love the people and especially the sweet sounds of the street in the community.

I’m not saying it’s for everyone, but sound in the streets is everywhere from the pre-dawn until late in the night. One of our favorites is the clown-car like horn for the helado or ice cream bicycle vendor as he slowly pedals up the side streets. The moto-taxis like to honk at each other as they pass on the street with a toot-toot wave of their own to their fellow drivers. The collectivo jitneys picking up service and hotel workers, already uniformed to head for neighboring resorts up and down the coast, all have a distinctive horn as they begin before 5 am and drop off after nightfall.

There is music everywhere in a low key battle of the bands from various businesses and casa to casa, house to house, as any walk along the few streets lined with small houses will greet you. The music is delivered, almost as a community service, from boom boxes in the front patios amidst cooking grills and hanging laundry in a symphony provided to someone’s own taste. In other houses, the streets are lit with the reflections of television screens from inside the front door, always on, but rarely being watched it seems.

Everyone is in the street all the time. Walking to work and walking back. Children playing. The sidewalks are for show, the street if for travel. When business is slow, a plastic chair sits in front of the open doorway of the establishment as the proprietor watches – and listens – as the world goes by.

And, then there are the loudspeakers built into the trunks of cars or on top of pickup cabs or protruding from back windows. The is a community outside of the range of television and internet advertising, so the hawking, whether for politicians or goods and services, is loud, direct, and sometimes even funny. In Mexico City we fell in love with the song of the junk dealers driving up and down and looking for whatever might be ready for them. In Puerto Aventuras, bread, vegetables, and fruit all have their carts or bicycle vendors with their own songs and shouts.

For several mornings we have heard a sermon of sorts down the block for an hour or two. No one minds. People proceed calmly within the cacophony of sounds. After a while it all becomes natural in the way one tunes out train whistles and ship foghorns near the train tracks and along the Mississippi River where we live in New Orleans. All of these are the sounds of security, safety, and community, and a reminder of how all of our communities may have been when they were loud with people out and about, rather than locked behind closed doors.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Trouble in Paradise as Industrial Tourism Denies Beach Access on Yucatan Peninsula

beach from Tulum ruins

Puerto Aventuras  Yeah, I know what you’re thinking: Wade, chill, you’re on vacation, dude, calmate! Sorry, that’s just not me, and, mi companeros y companeras, there’s big trouble in paradise.

Driving from Cancun to Puerto Morelosnot San Morelos to Puerto Aventuras to Tuluum along Mexican highway 305 from the minute one heads south we saw one outlandish Las Vegas style grand arch or entryway after another at countless resorts and gated communities towards the east and the Caribbean. What we did not see was any entry to the beach. That seemed strange.

We looked it up. As one authority after another stated: “The Mexican Constitution decrees all beaches to be publicly-accessible federal property and, as such, people have right of access to them anytime. There are some legal exceptions to the access rule, most notably, beaches classed or reserved for military use.”

We first took a peek at San Morelos, formerly a small fishing village hardly 30 kilometers south of Cancun. There was public access several places and though we saw many signs that this community was being “discovered,” the town was still approachable. In our small pueblo of Puerto Aventuras, the only access to the water was through a resort of the same name with a gate and guard in front. We asked our host where we could get to the water, and he said 20 kilometers down the road at Akumul. We did manage to get to the beach there, but it was on the sneak after bogarting our way past the private parking and the beach side condos where we found a small pocket park and finally just walked through a condo-plex to get there. Could we have gotten away with it if we were locals, no way! In Tulum, we asked a small restaurant where we were having sopa de mariscos how could we get to the beach, and he told us we could buy lunch at one of the restaurants, and they would let us in. After I told the waiter, but “We’re having lunch with you,” he just shrugged and smiled.

Azumal Beach on Yucatan

Turns out this is an area of huge contention, though largely hidden from the industrial tourism purveyors and those they serve. Tamar Diane Wilson in her book, The Economic Life of Mexican Beach Vendors, pulls no punches, calling it “socio-spatial apartheid.” Writing about Cancun itself she says the only way a native would see the water was “from a bus window, a kitchen, an unkempt hotel room, or the prism of some other subservient role.”

With some pride we found that some of our neighbors, even in Puerto Aventuras, had been part of beach protests in recent years. An EL UNIVERSAL article in October 2014 reported that:

“Local and federal lawmakers of the PRD requested the intervention of the Human Rights Commission in Quintana Roo and at national level, so that they issue an order to the authorities to demand that concessionaires at private businesses stop the illegal blockades that prevent residents of Cancun and Riviera Maya from enjoying the public beaches.

The councilor of the municipality of Solidaridad, Laura Beristain, also mentioned the recent blockade of access to Punta Esmeralda beach in Playa del Carmen or the protests of residents of Akumal and Puerto Aventuras in Riviera Maya due to the closure of access Public to the beaches.

Sadly, we have to report that more than two years later, the beaches are still blocked and this “socio-spatial apartheid” is still in full force and preventing Mexicans who live on the Peninsula from enjoying the natural resource and pleasure of these beautiful beaches that are their patrimony, while the law itself and their constitutional rights are being ignored with impunity.

Azumal Beach on Yucatan

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail