Anti-Union Forces Leaving the Courts and Statehouse to Hit the Doors

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Freedom Foundation Campaign Ad

New Orleans   The assault on unions is getting very personal. The legislative and legal attacks are part of the environment of constant struggle between unions and companies of course. People try to talk about America as a classless society, but when it comes to the labor-management tussle at work and in community, the class struggle is still part of the everyday experience.

Recently this has been politicized more crisply, especially after Citizens’ United and the surge of money into politics, when mega-rich, hyper-conservative gazillionaires realized that unions were one of the few institutions on the other side of the political divide that had the base and motivation to cobble together the dollars to meet them partway. What started with hate then morphed into strategy, and from there the tactical targets were clarified.

The right realized that the deep labor union pockets were still in the public sector since the industrial and private sector membership was falling like a rock towards 5% membership, if not below. If public sector unions and their membership could be eroded, then there was an almost open field for the right. So we’ve had Harris v. Quinn that broke union shop for homecare workers starting in Illinois. We’ve had near misses for union shop for school teachers with Justice Antonio Scalia’s death allowing us to dodge the bullet. And, thanks to the Koch brothers and their allies with ALEC, we’ve seen one statehouse and legislative chamber after another go right with new right-to-work campaigns and successes even in states like Michigan, an evisceration of public employee unions in Wisconsin, withdrawal of recognitions for lower wage workers in homecare in Michigan and Ohio, and more.

Now, they are engaging in hand-to-hand combat with teams of canvassers going door-to-door to attempt to convince union members to drop their membership and leave their unions. The Wall Street Journal reported on this new alarming anti-union tactic. A group called Freedom Foundation has raised a budget of more than $3 million in 2015 to employ hundreds of outreach people to work the list of union members in Oregon and Washington, available through public information, and do home visits with the sole purpose of getting home health and home childcare workers to withdraw from their union, which is the Service Employees International Union in this instance.

Tom McCabe who heads the Freedom Foundation claims that they have “knocked on the doors of about 15,000 home health-care and child-care workers out of about 50,000 overall in Washington state since July 2014.” He also claims he is targeting about 35,000 workers in Oregon. He also claims “the number of unionized child-care workers has fallen by 60% since he started the effort.” If true, they might have done 4000 or so home visits and convinced a couple of thousand workers to drop their membership at a cost of about $1500 per drop. That might make his program too pricey even for the mega-rich. Putting even more cold water on his claims, the head of the union in Washington, David Rolf, was quoted as saying that McCabe, “talks a big game, but they just aren’t having the impact they claim to be having.”

I’m sure Rolf is right, but that doesn’t mean this is any less painful for the union. This is about money. This kind of door-to-door, hand-to-hand combat means that a good part of the money the union might have spent on “offense,” in expanding rights, wages, and benefits for its members or new organizing, is now having to be spent on “defense,” to put organizers and others in the field to offset withdrawals and increase membership percentages. The objective of the conservative forces is to reduce labor’s expenditures on politics, and a field program like this has to be met in full and in force, allowing conservatives to win at either heads or tails if they reduce the level of contributions unions can make to advance their members’ interests.

The article in the Journal was obviously sales-and-promotion for McCabe and his so-called Freedom Foundation. He says he wants to take this door-to-door attack to California, Illinois, and Pennsylvania. We better hope he doesn’t succeed, but in the meantime, his advertisement, needs to also be our call to action.

Freedom Foundation Door Knockers

Freedom Foundation Door Knockers

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Breitbart News Taking Over Trump Campaign – OMG!

Ben Jackson/Getty Images for SiriusXM

Stephen Bannon Hosting Radio Show Photo Credit: Ben Jackson/Getty Images for SiriusXM

New Orleans   The devil has now taken over the details for the Trump campaign. It’s official now with his announcement this week that Stephen Bannon, the head the Breitbart News abomination of websites, clickbait, and hate speech, will now be running his entire campaign operation. Bannon has never managed a campaign at any level, but he’s qualified on two counts in Trump world. He’s worked his own “art of the deal” on Wall Street for years and of course he is a committed media provocateur. We can’t say he’s Trump’s evil twin, because he’s more like Trump’s real twin, if any of us can imagine such a thing. What a horror!

What does this signal? Well, it would seem that we are at the end of the road for any more of this “acting Presidential” posing from Trump. As he’s been warning, he wants to be himself again. This is going to be more of the “dancing with who brought me here,” and “doing it my way” shtick that he displayed so endearingly to his red-meat, mouth-breathing base during the Republican primaries.

But, wait a minute, I like red-meat, as much as the next person, and breathe out of my mouth whenever I need too as well, so let me be clear, deriding the Trump antics as “populist,” is elitist and offensive. These pundits, commentators, politicos, and others need to call the Trump stuff what it really is rather than trying to slander it as populist. They may not like Trump, but that doesn’t mean they like any of the rest of us any better!

A populist is someone, especially if it’s a politician, who wants to represent “ordinary” people, if there is such a thing, and the “common” people, who are very uncommon. That’s not Trump. Demagogue, yes! Rabble-rouser. Hate-speaker. Oh, yeah. Racist? Seems so. But, populist, no way! Look at his tax plan, which would be little more than another rich giveaway for proof positive.

Now with the Breitbart folks in charge, it’s likely that we haven’t seen anything yet. Roger Ailes, the recently canned impresario who built the even larger rightwing echo chamber at Fox News, is also reportedly advising the Trump effort now. These are peas in a pod. It could be that we won’t see anything worse than we have to date, but this is simply a refreshing bit of transparency for the Trump campaign. These guys have been on the sidelines and behind the curtain, and now they’re front-and-center.

Judging from the way Breitbart has now admitted paying for the video-scam attacks on ACORN though, this new legitimacy of sorts on the national scene is frightening, because if anything, win, lose or draw, it now appears that Trump and his foul-mouthed and minded friends are going to be bootstrapping their way from this campaign into more of the same after the election is over. Trump seems to be preparing himself to lose, but he’s building a future which will be built on the same hate and fear that Breitbart and his other cronies believe is what spurs their kind of action. They may be deciding that they are content with their 40% and want to lock it down even harder as a place and base for their future.

Heaven help all of us and the country where we live, but be clear, it’s not about the people, it’s only about them.

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Crisis in Home Ownership for Working Families and Minorities

San Jose much for sale but few are being sold (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

Much for Sale in San Jose   (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

New Orleans   Something big is happening in housing. Maybe big and bad. Maybe big and unknown, but scary in its uncertainty for the future.

Here are the facts that frighten.

Home ownership dropped again in the last quarter of 2016 and when it did so, it fell below 63% to the lowest level in 50 years.

Mortgage loans to African-American families fell in the review period between 2004 and 2014 from 7% of total mortgages for blacks to only 5% of mortgages issued. Hispanic families budged up slightly from 7 to 8%, Asian families stayed at 5%, and mortgages to white families zoomed up from 58% to 69%.

This analysis of Home Mortgage Disclosure Act data was done by the National Association of Real Estate Brokers. They argue in their report that this drop has to do with a tightening of credit standards after the 2007 housing meltdown. Couple that information with another recent statistic that prices in the housing market now are only 2% lower than their historic highs achieved in 2006 before the bubble burst. For the real estate brokers, it is in their interest to have their cake and eat it, too. A return of high prices means happy days for them. Claiming the decrease in much of minority-based lending is based on a change of standards, rather than a clearer manifestation of discrimination is also squarely in their interest.

The Wall Street Journal reported that one of the reasons that minorities are getting a smaller share of loans is the return of the jumbo mortgages to “more affluent borrowers with loans exceeding $417,000.” Mumbo-jumbo. Report after report also indicates with this surge in pricing what used to be “jumbo,” is now just standard operating procedure. Average housing prices have now hit $1 million San Jose for example. Meanwhile other reports speak to housing and income growth in center cities around the country, including in areas like Detroit and Philadelphia and deterioration of income and housing prices and values in working class areas of cities, along with the paradox of millennials wanting to live downtown which is pushing the prices up now, while Pew Research surveys are also saying they are only committed to living downtown for five or ten years. What then?

Anyway we shake-and-bake these figures, it is hard to maintain a belief that that part of the American Dream that included home ownership is still alive. We can’t have both stagnant incomes and rising home prices with narrower lending parameters and believe that home ownership can increase among low-and-moderate income families. The conservative blame-game that tried to saddle the housing collapse not on Wall Street recklessness but on lax lending standards has mutated into a form of de facto national housing policy.

Does that mean there will be more affordability in the rental market? There’s no indication of any new trend there, and in fact market-rate construction for the millennials is still the driver. Meanwhile neither political candidate has a program around housing, much less affordable housing, and if values are falling in low-and-moderate income communities that are not on the gentrification list, that also means that citizen wealth will continue to drop like a rock.

Housing is now on the trajectory from problem to issue to crisis, and the silence around solutions is depressing and deafening.

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Please enjoy East Coast Girl by Butch Walker. Thanks to KABF.

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Milwaukee and Other Cities are Explosions Waiting to Happen

 An eviction in Milwaukee in December. Often, landlords turn to informal methods to get families to leave.Photograph by Philip Montgomery for The New Yorker

An eviction in Milwaukee in December. Often, landlords turn to informal methods to get families to leave. Photograph by Philip Montgomery for The New Yorker

New Orleans    For quite a while in these times of inequity and polarization around income, class, race, and so many other issues, there has seemed – at least to me – a fuse steadily and slowly burning towards an explosion in our cities. We are definitely seeing it now in Milwaukee, as the community rioted in destructive anger in reaction to a black policeman 24-years old killing a fleeing black man 23-years old, who was also armed.

The anger is erupting because it comes from an unrequited rage. Elements of the community are saying, essentially, “We don’t care about whether police say the killing was justified or not; the killing has to stop!” We can quibble and disagree about the facts, the tactics, and the collateral damage, but it is hard to argue that police occupation of lower income, largely minority communities is working to either stop crime or, even more importantly, to protect and secure the communities themselves or integrate them fully into the overall life of the city. People are drowning without lifelines or lifeboats in sight. No one could have read the book, Evicted¸ and its close, hard look at conditions in Milwaukee’s lower income neighborhoods around housing, which are little different than scores of other cities, without understanding that all of these situations are powder kegs waiting for matches.

But, as Milwaukee is demonstrating, to see the crisis as a simple matter of police-community relationships where strategy and tactics have gone terribly awry, is also a mistake. These issues and estrangements are bigger than that, and they are more comprehensive. The police are simply at the front of the line, but everyone else is still in the queue, equally responsible. There are few better examples that the surprise the press is finding in Milwaukee that they are also a target of protest and rage.

The police are the close-at-hand occupiers, while the press is now increasingly the far removed observers. As newspapers and other media outlets have drastically cut the staffing of their newsrooms in the technological crisis within their industry, the coverage of communities of class and color, which were never robust, are now even more drastically depleted. Any casual conversation with community organizers will quickly reveal how invisible the work has become and how increasingly shrouded their communities have become. Large protests and similar events go unreported. When covered, it’s often now a student intern or stringer or a photographer sent just to get a picture. We’re back in the 50’s again where the mainstream media largely depends on self-appointed or downtown-vetted community leaders rather than facts and forces on the ground, so who is surprised that when they show up in the community there’s something less than applause.

The New York Times quoted a community advocate in Milwaukee with a radio show saying, “Our stories get mixed.” At first I thought this might be a misquote and that he really said, “nixed,” but he was more likely saying that the stories suffer from too much two-handed coverage, where the voices of the community are muted and the issues, no matter how stark, are diluted.

Not to keep being the Cassandra here, but attention must be paid. As I keep arguing, for all the noise out there, this all seems like the fire this time, and there will be no excuse for policy makers, politicians, and other institutions, large and small, to act even remotely surprised when it breaks out everywhere.

Nothing is being done to solve these problems, so who would be surprised that people start expressing their anger in whatever ways are still available to them.

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Please enjoy this version of The Midnight Special by Billy Bragg & Joe Henry. Thanks to KABF.

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More Lead Drama in Schools, but More Progress

Testing of Lead in School Drinking Fountains

Testing of Lead in School Drinking Fountains

New Orleans  Why aren’t all school districts in the country simply crying “Uncle” and conceding that they will test all of their schools for lead in the water? They must know this is a tide coming towards them that they cannot resist. Yet, still we find foot dragging and, in some cases, the flimsiest of excuses thrown in our way.

Last time we visited this topic, we were noting the progress made by Local 100 with the officials of the Houston Independent School District (HISD) on this issue. As we reported, they were willing to finally accelerate the testing program so that all schools in the district would be tested within 2 to 3 years, rather than the 30 plus they had initially proposed at 10 or so per year. All good. Real progress!

But, not so fast. When Orell Fitzsimmons, director of Local 100’s office in Houston talked to them in more detail about the testing program and shared information about other school districts’ program, it turned out that they were NOT planning to test any of the water fountains. Bizarre, since this is perhaps the main entry point for water to get in our little darlings’ systems. When pushed by the union and some of our school board allies, the response from the district was, “No problem. We have filters on all of the water fountains.” Problem solved.

No, Fitzsimmons and some of our members in maintenance then checked on the water fountains including the models and serial numbers. Whoops! Turns out filters were not installed on water fountains of that era. So, check and checkmate, and the district has now agreed to check all of the water fountains. The question that lingers here and elsewhere, is why the obfuscation. We’re talking about children and their safety. Why play games?

There’s also progress in New Orleans finally. A front page story on lead and a picture of leaders and members from A Community Voice, affiliated with ACORN International, demanding testing in all of the schools is finally making progress. It’s slippery, but the response has come from one of the school board members indicating they will test all schools and are going to use the better protocols from West Virginia which have become the standard nationally exceeding that of the EPA. Louisiana is also pushing the Orleans School board to notify all parents that they need to have their children tested in conformity with Louisiana State law. Needless to say that it’s happening.

Meanwhile, Local 100 members are on the move towards the school board meeting in Dallas and Little Rock at the end of this month to demand testing in these district as well. A meeting with retired workers with lead exposure is also being scheduled in Dallas. It will be interesting to see whether Dallas and Little Rock are learning something from other districts and ready to say “Uncle” and get on with it, or is going to drag this out at the risk of more workers and students?

ACV action on Lead in Water in NOLA Schools

ACV action on Lead in Water in NOLA Schools

Dr. Marc Edwards of Virginia Tech assembling lead testing kits

Dr. Marc Edwards of Virginia Tech assembling lead testing kits

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Obamacare is Delivering Some of the Goods in Poor States

Screen Shot 2016-08-14 at 10.37.59 AMNew Orleans   There are now some thirty states that have expanded eligibility for Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. There are twenty states – and a lot of the Republican Congress — that are still dragging their wagons through the dirt, and, if researchers are right, putting their people under the ground as well.

Researchers connected with Harvard’s Public Health School conducted an important experiment. They surveyed people in Kentucky and Arkansas before Medicaid expansion in 2013, again after the first full year in 2014, and finally at the end of 2015 with another year under peoples’ belts. They used Texas as the so-called control state for comparison, since Texas refused to budge on the Obamacare Medicaid expansion for lower-income, working families. Bottom line: 5% more people in Arkansas and Kentucky, too very different states with different approaches on the expansion, felt that they were in “excellent” health compared to do-nothing-much Texas.

Reading about the researchers work on the Harvard Public Health website and its lead author, Dr. Benjamin Sommers, an assistant professor there, offered a good summary that goes deeper than 5%:

Sommers and colleagues surveyed approximately 9,000 low-income adults in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Texas from late 2013 to the end of 2015. The results showed that, between 2013 and 2015, the uninsured rate dropped from 42% to 14% in Arkansas and from 40% to 9% in Kentucky, compared with a much smaller change in Texas (39% to 32%). Expansion also was associated with significantly increased access to primary care, improved affordability of medications, reduced out-of-pocket spending, reduced likelihood of emergency department visits, and increased outpatient visits. Screening for diabetes, glucose testing among people with diabetes, and regular care for chronic conditions all increased significantly after expansion. Quality of care ratings improved significantly, as did the number of adults reporting excellent health.

Debate over? Of course not. Many will wonder, and wait, until larger studies, including the government’s own, provide more data on whether or not people really are healthier or just feel healthier.

Regardless, how people feel may not answer the medical questions fully, but could start to provide answers for the political questions. As we find every day, particularly in the Age of Trump, people vote on how they feel, not based on the facts of the matter. If everything were equal, politicians would see that the trend line of how people feel about their own health and Medicaid expansion is now improving annually. If it continues along these lines, politicians will start playing “duck and cover” which might mean more expansion in the twenty holdout states.

There’s a big “if” though. These same politicians would actually have to care about the poor families that are the beneficiaries of Medicaid expansion, and believe, regardless of the evidence, that they vote, and that some of these poor are their voters.

It might be easier to deliver better healthcare than to convince elected officials of the value of the poor and their votes.

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