Welcome to the No-Insurance Emergency Rooms as Long as They Last

New Orleans  The Congressional Budget Office has released its score on the cost and impact of the Senate Republicans version of healthcare coverage. The bottom lines have gotten wide publicity. 22 million will lose insurance by 2026, 15 million almost immediately. 15 million lower income people will lose Medicaid coverage. It wasn’t big news that this will be an income transfer from the poor to the rich, because we had already known that was coming in all the Republican bills.

Elderly people hoping to live long enough to qualify for Medicare will have to run the gauntlet, unless they are wealthy. The New York Times gave two examples from the CBO report that were appalling.

for a typical 64-year-old with an annual income of $26500, the net premium in 2026 for a midlevel silver plan – after subsidies – would average $6500, compared with $1,700 under the Affordable Care Act. And the insurance would cover less of the consumer’s medical costs. Likewise, the report said, for a 64-year-old with an annual income of $56,800, the premium in 2026 would average $20,500 a year, or three times the amount expected under the Affordable Care Act.

Yes, you understand the math. In the first example that’s a quarter of the person’s income and in the second it’s more than one-third, 36% to be exact.

The Senate added an amendment at the request of the insurance industry recently that anyone not on insurance more than 60 days would have to wait 6-months to get coverage and pay 30% more on their premiums. The industry recognized that as bad as this bill is, no one is going to get coverage until they are sick, so they wanted to try and put some boulders in the road.

And, of course they are right. With no mandate and no penalties for not having insurance most people will not get insurance for the plain and simple reason that they won’t individually be able to afford it unless their employer is providing it for them. Young people on insurance will be rare. For the rest of the population, health insurance will be the American version of Russian roulette. How long can you wait before getting insurance? People will be arbitraging their family fiances against their lives.

What if you are diagnosed with cancer or something and have to wait 6-months for treatment? In the short term survival for you and tens of millions of others will mean throwing yourself on the mercy of the hospital emergency room, as long as the law doesn’t allow them to refuse service, and until so many of these hospitals go bankrupt from providing care without government support or private insurance payments.

There’s a reason why hospitals, doctors, nurses, and everyone connected to providing health care services have opposed these bills. It’s not because many will lose their jobs as healthcare facilities go under, which they certainly will. They aren’t politicians. They’ll see the people dying at their door, too late to save, and too poor for the insurance, yet too rich for any assistance. Who wants to live through that?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

I’m Not Complaining, but What a Week

New Orleans  Returning exhausted from stops in Shreveport, Louisiana, Little Rock, Arkansas, and Greenville, Mississippi, somehow I can’t get these weird signposts of the times and odd ends out of my mind. Normally, I would let them go, but somehow this Chief Organizer Report is going to be a report on the chief organizer, so bear with me.

Bargaining four nursing home contracts in Shreveport, the company already wants to include language making the Affordable Care obligations moot, even while the whole operation continues forward in the stalemate of Congress and presidential politics.

A studio chair and some folding chairs for WAMF, the new low power FM radio station that we just got on the air in New Orleans, was donated to us in Bossier City across the river (thanks Butlers and Clarks!). In a pleasant middle income suburb between a mall and an expressway, I parked my big truck, doors wide open in the driveway of the unoccupied house waiting for Local 100 organizer, Toney Orr from Arkansas, to help me load it all in. Neighbors drove by and up and down the driveway next door. No questions asked, even as we hauled the furniture out. Is that weird?

In Little Rock, despite six months of work on the Home Savers Campaign and running PSAs on KABF referring calls to Arkansas Community Organizations, the former Arkansas ACORN, that yielded little, we finally broke through and within 48 hours found a trove of both Vision Property Management and Harbour Portfolio rent-to-own and contract to purchase houses throughout central Arkansas. We had boomed out to visit victims in Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania and here they were right under our noses! The lesson, even when the spirit is willing, we have to shore up the capacity to account for how often the flesh of our operations need more underwire. Capacity matters, even a little can make a huge difference, and that’s worth remembering. Oh, and, a Home Savers organizer, Dine’ Butler, was the big finish of the well-regarded Reveal podcast, home visiting a victim in Detroit.

Capacity, capacity, capacity, it comes up again and again, and amazingly we stumble around trying to find it even when it is kicking us in the knees and pushing us to the ground. One kingdom after another lost for lack of a horse. Our biggest underwriting partner at KABF was being stymied on promoting its great work, because we had never pressed hard enough for the spots for them to realize if they gave us copy we could produce them quickly or allow hosts to do “reads.” Ouch!

Visiting radio station WDSV in Greenville for the 7th month, it was the same story with a different verse. Frustrated and stalled in achieving their mission after 5 years on-the-air as the voice of the people in the Delta, they were being held hostage by technology too large and complicated for them to easily access to master the ladder to the heaven they sought. The magic and miracle is not that we can fix that, but that it takes so long for us to marry problems to solutions, so that we can move forward in our work.

Sometimes I’m racing so fast that I miss how easily it is to stumble on the simplest steps. I wish it were just me!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail