Bad Boy Banks Running Wild While Creating Credit Desert

New Orleans  Rather than learning something about proper corporate behavior in the banking meltdown they triggered with their housing securitization schemes and unwillingness to supervise mortgage brokers, the gazillion dollar bailout seems to have taught the banking establishment that they could act in all ways with impunity. As we move towards the ten year mark of this national and community disaster, there are too many examples that come readily to mind.

One of the most disturbing is the way banks are now flaunting the Community Reinvestment Act of 1975 by creating a credit desert in lower income and minority neighborhoods. We are now reading regularly about complaints being filed against banks for outright racial discrimination.

The giant Wells Fargo was finally called to account in a rare exercise by the Office of the Controller of the Currency of its authority in reviewing the annual CRA records of all regulated lending institutions. Wells Fargo was given a “needs to improve,” and given the watered down nature of the CRA now, a bank really has to mess up to get such a negative rating by the OCC. The CEO said he was disappointed, but to quote one banking newsletter:

10 government inquiries over the past decade prompted the OCC to lower its overall score of the company’s compliance with community banking laws to “needs to improve.” Enforcement cases cited by the OCC faulted the bank’s treatment of minority neighborhoods, military personnel and women who had recently given birth. “Bank management instituted policies, procedures and performance standards that contributed to the violations for which evidence has been identified,” the OCC wrote in a report. Abuses occurred in “multiple lines of business,” the regulator said.

This will hurt Wells Fargo because it is a critique of the pervasive and arrogant culture of the bank. Whether it will get them to modify their behavior is uncertain.

Another case in point with another giant based North Carolina this time rather than based in California, found a bankruptcy judge administering a beat down to the Bank of America for its thuggish handling of a foreclosure in California.

A bankruptcy judge in California fined Bank of America $45 million over the bank’s mistaken foreclosure on a family’s home and mishandling of the loan modification process on their mortgage calling it “brazen” and “heartless.”

In this case Bank of America’s standard trick of losing the loan mod paperwork was exposed for the duplicity that has been infamous in their handling of modifications and ruthless, and sometimes, incorrect foreclosures.

If this is the way the big letter, top of the list banks are handling loans to lower income and imperiled families across the country, is it any wonder that hedge funds and other financial vultures are swooping into our neighborhoods with one predatory lending instrument after another, feeling confident that they can rob and steal without any consequences, preferring to pay the fines, rather than do right?

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Wells Fargo, Criminal Enterprise

ct-wells-fargo-settlement-questions-oversight-20160910New Orleans   I’ve never been a fan of Wells Fargo. We fought them endlessly over predatory lending practices in mortgages and subprime products. They don’t listen, they obfuscate, stonewall, and hide behind layers of lawyers in stubborn refusal even when faced with evidence of clear misdeeds. We were able to fight Citicorp, Bank of America, HSBC, and a ton of subprimes, even Countrywide, and succeed in reforming practices and achieving decent settlements, but Wells Fargo, even when they settled did so narrowly and without conviction. I was clear for ACORN and our members, you just can’t trust a bank like that with your money.

It is some relief that now everyone in the United States is getting a crash course in learning that Wells Fargo is not the community banker it has claimed to be, but a criminal enterprise.

Let’s review the facts, now being widely reported. For five years employees of Wells Fargo opened up to 2 million bank and credit card accounts willy-nilly without any permission from anyone. Often the accounts were closed fairly quickly which is why the penalties now being paid by the bank are less than $200 million. It was a penny ante, amateur scam with employees making up email addresses and sometimes virtually opening up the accounts from Wells Fargo internet domains. The bank has now fired 5300 employees who were involved in this fraud. As the New York Times’ columnist, Andrew Sorkin, points out, “that’s not a few bad apples.”

Wells Fargo has taken out ads apologizing and taking responsibility, but they clearly, as usual, have their fingers crossed behind their backs. A couple of months ago before all of this criminality became public, they allowed Carrie Tolstedt, a 27-year veteran and their head of “community banking,” to retire and walk away with over a $120 million going away present. Various banking analysts are calling for a “clawback” since Wells has rules allowing them to recover monies from executives where there were ill-gotten gains. The Wall Street Journal was so grossed out by all of this that they reported the calls for clawbacks and showed a picture of Ms. Tolstedt, but couldn’t bring themselves to mention the $120 million she took away with her office plants for fear that all of us Visigoths would be clamoring at the gates.

What will they learn? Likely nothing.

But, it’s easy to explain how this happens, and it is the same way that it happened when mortgage brokers were writing fictitious so-called, “lair’s loans,” where many observers of the 2008 financial meltdown are still confused and some think it was the borrower fibbing, rather than the underwriter. In the current Wells Fargo case on cards and accounts, as well as their own and many other situations previously on loans, it is crystal clear that once you link pay to simple production, you can guarantee there will be fraud. The only question will be how long it takes you to be caught, and how much money the bank makes in the interim.

For managers there, just like Carrie Tolstedt, there is a disincentive to impose the kind of controls that would weed out these problems. Top dogs get paid on the numbers, just like the runts of the litter. In bank after bank, once you get them across the table for all of their talk about protection using sophisticated algorithms, risk management, and blah, blah, blah, they simply are culturally and systemically unable to tightly manage on performance and standards, once production is all, and pay is linked to such incentives.

They are all smart enough to know this, but it’s the nature of capitalism in some ways to ignore it. You can only conclude that they didn’t care or thought that they wouldn’t be caught. None of which recommends a bank like Wells Fargo as a place to trust your money, since they are clearly committed to themselves first and their customers last, as little more than numbers being crunched in their back rooms somewhere.

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Please enjoy Phish’s Breath and Burning. Thank you KABF.

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