Sessions and Republicans’ ACORN Obsession Blocks DOJ Settlement Funds to Nonprofits

New Orleans   The clock may be ticking on Jeff Sessions, the former Alabama Senator, as Attorney General. Reportedly he offered his resignation to the President in recent days as Trump tweeted his displeasure at the Justice Department’s modifications of his travel ban. Nonetheless, an order from his office seemed to come out of nowhere last week barring nonprofits and third-party groups from participating in any implementation and remediation ordered as part of financial and other settlements approved by lawyers with the Justice Department. Who saw this coming?

Well, anyone who has followed the obsessions that Sessions and his old Republican colleagues continue to have with all things ACORN and nonprofits as a whole, that’s who.

What is Sessions talking about? Frequently settlements with big companies include provisions for remediation that can only be appropriately implemented by nonprofits. The Volkswagen emissions cheating scandal included a requirement that the company invest $2 billion to fund zero-emission technology and the related support to achieve zero-emission cars in the future. Settlements from the banking catastrophes that triggered the Great Recession also routinely included remediation by nonprofits involved in financial education or housing counseling involving groups as disparate as the American Bankruptcy Institute, La Raza, NeighborWorks, and the Urban League, all of whom have long standing programs in these areas. Republicans see this as unrelated and a siphoning off of money to create slush funds to support the nonprofits.

And, here’s where the ACORN obsession comes in. The Nonprofit Quarterly quoted one of its late columnists, saying….

Subcommittee chairman Tom Marino (R-PA) grilled a Justice Department witness over whether anyone from the White House or some unknown outside group had guided Justice and the banks on the selection of the third-party implementers—again, the specter of the hand of ACORN all but flowing from Marino’s lips. Rep. David Trott (R-MI) concluded that the settlement agreement process “looks and smells a little bit like a slush fund” and raised suspicions about how the banks got access to the list of HUD-approved nonprofit counseling agencies (apparently unaware that they are on the HUD website). Marino then observed that the Justice Department’s prosecution of the banks on mortgage lending issues amounted to “using extortion to make banks appropriate funds to left-leaning organizations.”

Or as reported by the Huffington Post…

.as part of Bank of America’s $16.65 billion settlement with the Department of Justice in 2014 (a former subsidiary of the company, Countrywide Financial, was one of the most toxic subprime mortgage lenders), the bank could donate $100 million to community and legal groups. Such donations to approved groups would then count toward the settlement’s total value. Conservative groups portrayed the Obama administration as a shadowy slush fund for leftist organizations, hyping connections of the groups that received funding to ACORN, the Republican boogieman that was defunded after false accusations of wrongdoing.

You get it now?

No matter the fact that ACORN and other groups working in lower income communities saw their neighborhoods, families, and work thwarted by these nefarious corporate practices, the key issue for the Republicans is making sure that these communities remain impoverished and continue to be feeding grounds for corporate vultures.

Thank Jeff Sessions for keeping hate and harm alive and well.


Bad Boy Banks Running Wild While Creating Credit Desert

New Orleans  Rather than learning something about proper corporate behavior in the banking meltdown they triggered with their housing securitization schemes and unwillingness to supervise mortgage brokers, the gazillion dollar bailout seems to have taught the banking establishment that they could act in all ways with impunity. As we move towards the ten year mark of this national and community disaster, there are too many examples that come readily to mind.

One of the most disturbing is the way banks are now flaunting the Community Reinvestment Act of 1975 by creating a credit desert in lower income and minority neighborhoods. We are now reading regularly about complaints being filed against banks for outright racial discrimination.

The giant Wells Fargo was finally called to account in a rare exercise by the Office of the Controller of the Currency of its authority in reviewing the annual CRA records of all regulated lending institutions. Wells Fargo was given a “needs to improve,” and given the watered down nature of the CRA now, a bank really has to mess up to get such a negative rating by the OCC. The CEO said he was disappointed, but to quote one banking newsletter:

10 government inquiries over the past decade prompted the OCC to lower its overall score of the company’s compliance with community banking laws to “needs to improve.” Enforcement cases cited by the OCC faulted the bank’s treatment of minority neighborhoods, military personnel and women who had recently given birth. “Bank management instituted policies, procedures and performance standards that contributed to the violations for which evidence has been identified,” the OCC wrote in a report. Abuses occurred in “multiple lines of business,” the regulator said.

This will hurt Wells Fargo because it is a critique of the pervasive and arrogant culture of the bank. Whether it will get them to modify their behavior is uncertain.

Another case in point with another giant based North Carolina this time rather than based in California, found a bankruptcy judge administering a beat down to the Bank of America for its thuggish handling of a foreclosure in California.

A bankruptcy judge in California fined Bank of America $45 million over the bank’s mistaken foreclosure on a family’s home and mishandling of the loan modification process on their mortgage calling it “brazen” and “heartless.”

In this case Bank of America’s standard trick of losing the loan mod paperwork was exposed for the duplicity that has been infamous in their handling of modifications and ruthless, and sometimes, incorrect foreclosures.

If this is the way the big letter, top of the list banks are handling loans to lower income and imperiled families across the country, is it any wonder that hedge funds and other financial vultures are swooping into our neighborhoods with one predatory lending instrument after another, feeling confident that they can rob and steal without any consequences, preferring to pay the fines, rather than do right?