Republicans Dilemma: Can Fear and Hate Alone Win an Election?

Immigrant rights activists hold up a fabric wall to protest against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in Cleveland, during the third day of the Republican convention.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Fabric wall to protest against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in Cleveland, during the third day of the Republican convention.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

New Orleans   Having just returned from euro-world, I have to admit that I was surprised I wasn’t asked more questions about Donald Trump. During George W’s time, the questions were endless and strident. War does that to people. Folks brought up Trump for sure, but mostly with a smile on their face, not taking him seriously, though that would be a mistake, and in some ways not so much frightened by him as they were by Bush, but more amused at what they saw as America’s embarrassment at the hands of the crazy uncle coming out of the closet after the dignity, regardless of any disappointments, of Obama.

Now that I’m back and parsing the recent Republican National Convention, I have to ask myself, “can fear and hate alone win an election?” The answer is of course, yes, but we’ve never seen ourselves as pre-war Germany or Bosnia or Rwanda or modern Poland or Turkey after the recent coup, so it’s a stretch. Even jaded observers like myself, keep repeating a mantra to ourselves that “it can’t happen here.” But, in some ways that’s channeling our inner-Pollyanna, because it is happening here at the state level in places like Arizona, Kansas, and way too much of Texas. There’s also something that has been in the water in Wisconsin in recent years that makes you wonder what happened to that bastion of liberalism and labor strength?

Hillary Clinton to her credit is still holding the line against hate trying to position her candidacy and the Democratic Party as a more inclusive alternative for a wider demographic in the United States. There is certainly polarity. I can’t remember reading a poll like the recent one by the Wall Street Journal where a presidential candidate – in this case, Trump – literally polled zero among African-Americans. Needless to say all of his talk about building an even bigger wall between the US and Mexico has not helped his numbers get higher among Latinos either.

Talking to Randy Cunningham, a veteran community and tenant organizer and longtime activist in Cleveland, on Wade’s World was inspiring to hear about the success of peoples’ nonviolent attempts to have their voices heard by the Republicans in Cleveland over the last week. The “Wall Off Trump” action put together by unions and progressive organizations from the Working Families’ Party to Chicago’s La Gente and our old friends at the Ruckus Society, he described as very effective and lots of fun. The opening action on Monday that he and a large coalition put together pulled more between 1500 and 2000 and despite the fear mongering by the Trump team that there would be “blood in the streets.” He described the event as the largest action in Cleveland since the late 1970s and early 1980s. More positively, he believed that there may be an unexpected legacy of the RNC hate and fear mongering in Cleveland this week, and that is a resurgence of organizing and action in Cleveland.

Let’s hope that might be the result nationally of this fear-and-hate campaign. Trump thus far has no program other than “vote for me.” Clinton is matching the fear factor reportedly with a vice-presidential partner who will have some credibility there. She is still lacking a bit in what Sarah Palin famously called the “hope-y” thing that for all of the derision actually has been winning recent presidential elections.

The one thing that is certain: this is going to be a frightening several months until November!

abc_mk_rnc_01_jc_160718_31x13_1600 group-of-RNC-protesters-marching-in-Cleveland-jpg protest 1_1468803616833_42589481_ver1.0_640_480 trump_protest_759 Trump protest RNC

Please enjoy Regina Spector’s Bleeding Heart. Thank you KABF!

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Hillary Says, “If it’s Broke, I’ll Fix it”

51Wc+ZfNTSLNew Orleans    Hillary Clinton in a one-two punch has now laid out her prescription for the United States economy. She says it’s not about one-liners or fancy slogans, but her slogan seems to be: “If it’s broke, I’ll fix it.” She is positioning herself not exactly as the leader-of-the-free world but as the Maytag repairman, a modern day Rosie Riveter with a tool belt strapped around her waist.

She’s not making the mistake of over promising in her campaign pledges, and in fact it was hard to pick through the reports of her economic speech and find many promises at all.

Reportedly, she might try to get more people overtime, but that’s an Obama policy and DOL rule that is still being absorbed by workers and businesses. What would that be exactly? Something over $50,000 rather than the current mid-$40000 number? No revolution there. Another bone she threw out to workers is that she will do more to police and enforce wage and hour rules to curtail wage theft. Sounds good, but I’m pretty sure that would involve some serious beefing up of the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour division and its personnel, and given how badly this area has atrophied over the last 30 odd years, amen to that. I’m also pretty sure it would take a Congressional appropriation that would actually give the DOL money to finally do that job, and I’m not sure there are many Republican Congressman in the majority that are looking to muscle up on small and medium sized businesses.

She says she’ll renegotiate some of the trade pacts. As most of us know by now anything that has to do with trade negotiations takes forever, so she might be messing with that assignment deep into a second term, if she were able to win one. No holding our breath on that either.

She says there are fix-it-quick deals she can make that would perk up the economy with massive infrastructure investments. That’s a well-traveled road from the Obama Administration as well, and sounds good, but it’s hard to believe there’s a real deal there with Congress either, other than the usual, “when we say, infrastructure, they say, pork.” Oh, she also says she’ll get something going on immigration reform. I’m hearing Trump’s hateration as the soundtrack on this one which, win or lose, is likely to continue to make a lot of conservative Congressmen timid here on real reform, unless this is just a sop she’s throwing to Silicon Valley and its special pleading to bring in more foreign engineers to play with computers and code.

Ok, so this is thin soup so far. She’s saying she’s “feeling your pain” and grabbing her tool belt, but she’s still talking about fulfilling pretty small work orders. She adds, according to the New York Times, that’s not a problem though because, “… she will campaign and govern with a five-point plan, drawn up by subject-area experts, incorporating the full range of potential legislative and administrative tools available to the next president.”

Wow! I’d like to meet the person who takes either comfort or inspiration from a future “five-point plan, drawn up by subject-area experts.” There’s leading from behind, but I’m not sure that American workers and wannabe workers are ready to be happy with her being this far behind.

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Clinton Wins, Sanders Sulks

Screen Shot 2016-06-08 at 10.05.44 AMNew Orleans   In the last major bout of voting, Hillary Clinton decisively sewed up the Democratic nomination for President to become the first woman nominee of a major party, and making history in the bargain, 95 years after women first won the vote. She prevailed in indisputable fashion, winning the California primary decisively at 56% with 94% of the vote tallied, as well as primaries in New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota.

Furthermore for all of the carping, Clinton “succeeded in winning a majority of pledged delegates, a majority of the states that have held primaries, and the popular vote.” There will be a lot said, though I bet little in real terms that will be done, about the status of superdelegates in the future, but this was not a “rigged” victory. Clinton won fair and square and California was a stake through the heart of the Sanders campaign.

I interviewed Sanders organizer and longtime organizer and activist, Pat DeTemple, on Wade’s World last week about a paper he had been circulating around the Sanders camp that is part of the edition of Social Policy now at the presses. He had confidently predicted victory in California for Sanders, and was arguing that even so, it was time for Sanders to take the next step, organize an independent expenditure committee, start going after Trump, and make sure that Clinton, (gulp, sneeze, and cough) wins in November. Sanders winning North Dakota and Montana doesn’t do the job. California was his Battle on the Little Bighorn, and he was massacred. It’s time for him to shift to a new battlefield and leave this one. The nomination is Clinton’s.

Reportedly, President Obama called Sanders over the weekend. They are supposedly meeting on Thursday. It may be the White House, but it could be the woodshed. Obama is stepping up as the leader of his party to give Sanders a chance to exit on the lawn, arm in arm with the President, with a huge measure of the kind of grace that Obama can bring to such an event. The clock has wound down and the opportunity is now gone for a Sanders scowl and sulk. He’s had the opportunity to watch one Republican princeling after another walk the plank, so he knows the walk, and this is the best path for him – and the rest of us — to take.

Revolutions are about sacrifice, and they start with knowing that’s it’s not about you, but about the people. Senator Sanders fought the good fight and now there are other fights that wait for him, when he’s ready and willing, so he needs to help lead in that direction. In the meantime it’s worth remembering, that in this situation even the Beatles gave good advice, singing….

You say you want a revolution
Well, you know We all want to change the world
You tell me that it’s evolution
Well, you know We all want to change the world
But when you talk about destruction
Don’t you know that you can count me out

You say you got a real solution
Well, you know
We’d all love to see the plan
You ask me for a contribution
Well, you know
We’re all doing what we can
But if you want money
For people with minds that hate
All I can tell is brother you have to wait
You say you’ll change the constitution
Well, you know
We all want to change your head
You tell me it’s the institution
Well, you know
You better free you mind instead

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Polls Show Trump Now Leading Clinton, All Hands On Board!

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer/Andrew Spear/The New York Times Hillary Clinton button and Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) ORG XMIT: MIN2016040813524411

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer/Andrew Spear/The New York Times Hillary Clinton button and Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Little Rock  The latest average of all outstanding polls considering a two-way race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton for the first time shows that Trump has edged ahead of Clinton by a fraction of one-percent. Yes, there are many months to go before the election and polls will go up and down, but the consolidation of support around Trump is disturbing. Worse news indicates that with almost 70% of the November electorate likely to be white, Hillary’s support there is dropping like a rock. She’s now down to 33% support from white voters, and that’s men and women, brothers and sisters. Barack Obama in the 2012 election, a hater magnet for white voters like no others, polled 39% by comparison. We’ve got trouble in River City!

I’m not going to apologize for rooting for Trump to get the Republican nomination. I still think he is the best representative of everything that is most frightening at the confluence of all of the fringes of the right as they come together in elephantine proportions in that party. I still stand by the fact that the Cruz-Rubio-Bush-Etc group was even more rightwing and scary. I also still think that Trump is the best contrasting candidate for Hillary Clinton, giving her the best chance of mobilizing her potential base to win. Nonetheless, it’s like the NBA finals. It doesn’t matter what the record might have been in the preliminaries, she still has to get out there and beat him to claim the presidency, and she has not gotten her game together yet on her own.

Unfortunately, that is likely to mean that she can’t win without a full-court press from progressives as we hold our noses and cover our eyes at her neo-liberalism, war mongering, Wall Street ties, and myopic sense of self-entitlement. I’ve read a number of well written, thoughtful essays of advice for Sanders now that everyone in the country, but the Senator himself, seems to understand that he cannot and will not win the nomination, so he’s paying attention to no advice whatsoever, no matter how friendly or supportive. The papers and pundits are throwing bricks at his window trying to claim that he’s made his point, now he needs to move over, but every sign from inside the campaign is that he’s not hearing any of it and is still obsessed with every delegate. I get that. For sure, fight down to the last vote. Why listen to a bunch of self-serving advice from folks on the sidelines?

But, geez, man, help make a plan for tomorrow after the primaries are over to make all of this matter and help all of us join to move the base that’s now been built to a place to win in November and build a permanent fighting machine for progressives. You have demands, make them to the Clinton campaign. Have a say on the vice-presidential candidate, the potential president for the future, and make sure they are “one of our people.” Negotiate a role for your people and techniques in the structure of the party’s campaign from June to November. Agree to carry your weight until then, whether you go your own way or help build a new party or whatever once the election is over.

So, sure, Clinton is about as capable of change and listening to other voices as Sanders is being criticized for now, but with the election potentially hanging in the balance, there’s leverage there and opportunities that can now be seized. It’s time for all hands to get on board before Hillary sinks the ship, and Trump rides us all down to Davy Jones’ locker.

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Haters Going to Hide: The Trump Story Revealed

BN-ND016_IMMIGR_P_20160316182315New Orleans   There’s hardly room in the newspapers and weekly magazines these days for other news between the pulling of hair and rending of clothes by all of the pundits and data dogs about how they miscalculated the odds on the Trump nomination and their fumbling around trying to figure out the “who” of the Trump voter.  Judging by an article in Harper’s as one prominent example, the temptation is going to be to stereotype his voting base as whacko haters. 

Big, big mistake.  You can’t have a demagogue without the demos, the people, boiling with anger, and the candidate ready to meet it and move it forward.

Pew Research has also weighed in with some frightening news:  haters are not just going to hate, they’re going to hide.  Pew found that internet polls compared to telephone polling was finding another 8% or more of Trump support that was not willing to come clean talking to a semi-real person on the blower.  These are the monkey wrench folks everywhere in America who see a chance to flup the stuff up and show all of them, whoever they are, that they want to be heard and not just heard, but heeded.

Even more dangerous to my lights is that they are fired up and aren’t going to take it anymore, while Clinton supporters are on autopilot, snoring through the rallies or playing with their smartphones, while Rome is burning. 

The biggest fantasy is that Trump is going to change.  Not only is that not going to happen, but there’s every indication that behind the scenes, he’s getting high-fives and “git ‘r dones” from Republican politicians right and righter from Speaker Paul Ryan on down.  Whatever the rationale or fairytales they are telling themselves to try and put clothes on the emperor, they are almost universally in kowtow mode. 

Here’s hoping that women save us, and that Hillary actually figures out sooner rather than later how to play that card.  Reading about Trump’s private and personal interactions with women behind the scenes is a muckraker’s view of the slaughterhouse and the meat market.  Objectification is too long and dainty a word to describe the permanent, leering appraisal that seems to be Trump’s default.  This is a dirty old man!  And, he has been that way forever it seems.

Trump defines transactional politics devoid of principles of any sort.  In that sense he is the perfect representative of the modern political moment, almost startlingly transparent about the equation compared to all of the rest of the political class who try to hide the transactional nature of politics behind one artifice or another of pretense or philosophy.  As donors and opponents line up behind him, you can see the hopes for the main chance later, grifting the short game for the long. 

Sadly, there’s probably no better case study than Megyn Kelly, currently the queen of Fox News.  After being insulted in the vilest way by Trump and eviscerated by a boycott, she now props him for bringing her more attention, and exchanged her pride for an exclusive interview she hopes will propel her into the Oprah and Barbara Walters atmosphere.  She could have upped her game, instead she just signed up for the market exchange.

Here’s one thing for certain:  help America conserve water!  Take your daily shower after you read the morning papers, or you’ll have to take another one to wash off this filth before you leave the house. 

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Is Their Hope for Obamacare?

77639392New Orleans     A federal court somewhere gave new hope to the haters that the subsidies the Affordable Care Act to lower income families might be blocked.  The Administration says they will win on appeal.  But, this is only one cloud of many in the building thunderstorm.

            Insurance companies and those that follow them are almost universally saying that there will be significant price hikes in 2017.  Others are dropping by the wayside, largely because of their own bad pricing and marketing decisions, but nothing keeps them from finger pointing as they leave.  In many ways this was predictable.  As the signature legacy of President Obama, they are smart enough to wait until his long goodbye transitions into whatever and both he and Congress are lame ducks caught in a quacking stalemate, and roll up heavy on Clinton or Trump with the fait accompli

            Clinton has flirted towards the left with a vague proposal to potentially allow people 50 or 55 years of age to “buy into” Medicare, which would expand the coverage to millions more, if they have the money.  What it would still not do is solve any of the problems that continue to weigh heavily on Obamacare.

            Drug prices have continued to rise for example.  In fact, drug profiteering still seems a winning business plan despite the problems with Valeant and profiteers. 

            Charity requirements for nonprofits are still largely more pretense than policy.  Modern Healthcare reported 7 of the 10 most profitable hospitals of the top one-hundred in the country, according to a researcher at John Hopkins, were tax exempt nonprofits.  The three most profitable for profits were all part of the HCA chain and all three were in states like Texas and Florida that have not extended coverage under Obamacare.  Nonprofits were very well represented in the top 100, including Herman Memorial which has been the target of campaigns by Local 100 United Labor Unions and community allies in Houston and Ochsner, headquartered in New Orleans, which has also been called out for its miserly charity record.

            Emergency room doctors are reporting that half or more of the patients they are seeing are coming in late and with insurance, but had delayed seeking care because of the astronomical level of their deductibles, equivalent to having no insurance at all.   Employers of lower waged workers continue to develop such minimal coverage programs with impunity.  The coming year will see an even higher level of penalties appropriated against lower income workers who are running from the cost, deductibles, and copays, but will be caught by the mandated penalties.

            The bottom line is that, like any major piece of new potentially groundbreaking, safety net legislation there are problems.  There are pieces that beg to be fixed.  Meanwhile the deadlock in Congress simply lets the sores fester and pain endure without stepping up and fixing what is broken.  Health care continues to be a political football, as politicians maintain the fiction that this is all part of the game, rather than coming to terms with the fact that for many low and moderate income families, it’s life and death.

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