For Banks the Party Never Stopped

indexHouston        Seven years after the wheels started coming off the bank’s mad money train, it seems clear that settlements for mortgage abuse, which is euphemism for fraud, Dodd-Frank legislation, and what should have been the awesome weight of having collapsed the US and world economy and upended the lives of millions, have essentially been water off a duck’s back for the banking industry and Wall Street.

Let’s just tick off a few recent cases in point.

  • The City of Los Angeles, yes, not the Justice Department, SEC, or Federal Reserve, sued Wells Fargo for pressuring employees in its retail bank with sales quotas to fraudulently enroll people in new customer accounts without their approval.  Plain and simple, shake and bake, no permission needed.
  • Two big banks rather than settling for some hand slaps and big fines, Nomura, a Japanese bank, and the Royal Bank of Scotland, both presumably figuring their home country customers probably didn’t give much of a flip about whether or not they had packaged bad mortgages in the USA, went to trial claiming the dog-ate-their-homework, the economy did it, not them.  The judge found against these miscreants and essentially said their behavior was disgusting.
  • And of course there is the whole cabal of banks that engaged in price fixing and chicanery to fudge the LIBOR rate for interbank and corporate lending including HSBC, JP Morgan Chase, Citi, and a rogues’ gallery of the biggest banks in the world.  Their fines are in the billions, and reportedly they are going to finally have to actually plead guilty as institutions.

Many have argued that part of the problem was the legal double standard that found law enforcement playing paddy cake with the criminal enterprise that banking has become rather than prosecuting them aggressively from the top down.  If anything was administered more than simple detention, it was from the bottom-up.  The bigger the guy at the top of the bank, the bigger and more obscene the paycheck continued to be.

More proof that bad behavior and thuggery is the norm in banking is emerging in a new study as well.   According to the Andrew Ross Sorkin at The New York Times,

“...about a third of the people who said they made more than $500,000 annually contend that they ‘have witnessed or have firsthand knowledge of wrongdoing in the workplace.’  Just as bad:  ‘Nearly one in five respondents feel financial service professionals must sometimes engage in unethical or illegal activity to be successful in the current financial environment.’”

Such statements take your breath away.  Not only has it not gotten better, it may have gotten worse!   And, the President wonders why Senator Elizabeth Warren is willing to go to the wall on a trade bill that had hardly interested her until she noticed the language leading her to believe that it would allow even more transnational banking criminality?

There oughta be a law, but there probably are plenty of them, just no one seems to care, and the party goes on, and we all pay for it.

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The Beermats – A Workers Song

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More Evidence Emerging of the Big Banks Role in Mortgage Meltdown

0New Orleans      If there is anyone over the age of 10 years old that has any doubt that the pure and simple, unchecked greed of banks caused the mortgage meltdown triggering the Great Recession, please read, and listen carefully.   Information now coming out on the dealings between Morgan Stanley, the Wall Street behemoth that acted as the primary financier, facilitator, and purchaser of tranches from high-flyer New Century whose fall in 2007 signaled that the party was over make it crystal clear that they funded the mess until it broke the economy and almost bankrupted them as well.  Follow the big money and the trail becomes impossible to miss.

Reports are emerging from of all places an ACLU lawsuit, representing some buyers who lost their homes,  of emails and other information that has come from the discovery process.  Morgan Stanley tried to squash the suit, but a federal judge has now ruled that there is more than enough to push the matter forward.  The Justice Department and local prosecutors are also smelling blood in the water and predicting that Morgan Stanley will settle for a pretty penny before summer gets too hot.

Once again resources and their availability from Morgan Stanley seem to have been irresistible to New Century.  I’m in danger of starting to develop a global theory of how money and resources more than any other factor moves – or halts — not only too much of the work of social change but virtually all of what we see in not only this mess, but also tech, research, medicine, and a lot of other fields, so that’s a warning of things to come.

In this case,  Morgan Stanley was the biggest buyer of New Century subprime loans from 2004 to 2007, about $42 billion worth, and insisted that they wanted packages that were heavily weighted towards adjustable rate, ARM loans, or what the New Century CEO and co-founder once referred to in a negotiating session with ACORN and his own personal situation as “drinking his own Kool-Aid.”  Oh, and make sure they have pre-payment penalties as well, ok?  Risk and compliance factors low on the Morgan Stanley totem pole, in other words, not at the trading desks where sales are sex and everything else is road kill,  and were consistently ignored, even when the big bosses knew better.

According to a report in the New York Times

another lower-ranking due diligence officer, Bernard Zahn, who wrote detailed emails to both Ms. [Pamela] Barrow [a top diligence officer] and Mr. [Steven] Shapiro [head of the trading desk] explaining, in increasingly urgent terms, problems with the loans they had bought.  “It isn’t ‘just a couple of typos or ‘mistakes’ as it was suggested, the more we dig, the more we find.”  Ms. Barrow congratulated Mr. Zahn: “good find on the fraud :).” But rather than pursuing his findings, she immediately went on: “Unfortunately, I don’t think we will be able to utilize you or any other third party individual in the valuation department any longer.”

Hard to miss that message.   You can ask, just don’t tell.

Barrow in another exchange was pretty clear about what they thought of the quality of their borrowers as well, when she…

wrote to a colleague in 2006 sarcastically describing the “first payment defaulting straw buyin’ house-swappin first time wanna be home buyers.” “We should call all their mommas,” Ms. Barrow added in the email. “Betcha that would get some of them good old boys to pay that house bill.”

Well, yeah, and if loan affordability had ever been a criteria rather than bonuses and greed on Wall Street, millions might not have suffered. How do you explain all of that and what you did to your mommas and papas, Morgan Stanley big whoops?

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