Tag Archives: healthcare workers

Save Lives? Give Healthcare Workers Raises

New Orleans       Hey, bosses of healthcare workers, listen up!  Yo, consumers and families of healthcare services, pay attention to this, like your life is at stake, since for more than half of you over 65, it is, because you will end up in long-term care.  Policy peeps and political hacks, heads up:  pay attention in class.  What’s up?  There’s some news we can use thanks to some deep data analysis and research done by economist Krista Ruffini for the Minnesota Federal Reserve Bank.  (Higher Wages, Service Quality, and Firm Profitability: Evidence from Nursing Homes and Minimum Wage Reforms)

Here’s the bottom line:  Ruffini found that a 10% increase in the minimum wages for direct care staff in nursing homes led to less turnover, fewer inspection deficiencies, and 15,000 lives saved.  Yes, those of us who represent direct health care workers in nursing homes and community care facilities have always told you so, but now, finally, someone has marshaled the facts behind our arguments.  Ruffini in her paper notes that most previous research has been in production and retail work, so now we’re getting our due.

Furthermore, there was no evidence in her research that smaller healthcare operators went out of business nor that jobs were lost, nor were there regional differences.  The only downside is that operators increased their prices somewhat to cover the wage increases and tried to enroll more private patients, but frankly they have been doing that anyway without sharing much with the workers, so it’s more like a scratch, and less like a wound.

Some of this isn’t news exactly.  Ruffini notes that her work aligns other studies that have found that increasing pay for public employees like hospital workers improves “service quality” and for teachers “improves test scores.”

In another comment close to our beating union hearts, she notes that “…unionization decreases staffing levels but does not worsen patient outcomes, suggesting labor market policies can alter worker productivity in this sector.”  That’s interesting as well, especially when compared to the sound and fury of employers every time we launch an organizing drive in health care facilities.  She also found that such wage increase didn’t alter the “demographics” of the workforce nor the did it change the level of “credentialed” staffing, which is another way of telling employers that they would still be hiring from the same local racialized and gender-dominated labor pool, which might make them panic less.

Does any of this really matter, and will it mean more in the pockets of lower-waged direct care workers?  I’m betting yes.  The pandemic has raised public understanding of the necessity and existence of essential workers, while also underlining the fact that nursing home and other direct healthcare workers face hotspots.  Employers have had to respond in many cases with more protection for workers, pay increases, and hazardous duty pay.  Studies like Ruffini’s may make it harder to reduce wages, allowing direct care workers to hold onto these gains and convert them permanently, improving their lives and saving lives at the same time.  A rare, but welcome, win-win.

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Please enjoy Magnolia Road by The Allman Betts Band.

Thanks to WAMF.

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Some Changes the Coronavirus Should Bring

Pearl River     In the Age of Trump and the Time of the Coronavirus, there seems to be constant speculation about what changes in our society, habits, and government might be permanent given our collective experience.  Much of this is hyperbole.  One pundit argued that he went “to sleep in America and woke up in democratic socialist Europe.”  Oh, if dreams could come true!  Let’s instead talk about lessons we should learn in this crisis, and things that should absolutely change in the wake of this crisis.

The Affordable Care Act is now ten years old, celebrating its anniversary during the lockdown.  No matter Trump’s rhetoric and Mitch McConnell’s Senate Republican caucus, can anyone make the case that the private health insurance and the patchwork quilt of state health coverage is adequate for our people?  The elimination of mandatory coverage left our hospital network damaged, albeit their greedy pricing of their services, drugs, and the like are major players as well, forced mergers and left us with too many sick and not enough beds, equipment, and personnel.  Millions in states across the country are facing this crisis without any insurance.  That has to change.

How could we not learn that the internet has to become a public utility?  How could we not realize that we finally have to take this matter out of the hands of the telecoms and the pattycake FCC voluntary programs and eliminate the digital divide, here and around the world?  How can all the ideologues who want to argue that education is the answer, despite the facts, maintain their position as the country from elementary to college is pushed into on-line learning, leaving lower income families even farther behind?   Put this near the top of the list.

Living wages, paid sick leave, real unemployment benefits, the play pretend that gig workers are not employees, are all things that we have once again been taught have to be part of the safety net for everyone, especially lower waged workers and their families.   The failure of government in this crisis has to end the argument that somehow the private sector and the magic of market forces are somehow going provide for families.  They never have, and they never will.  That’s why we need a government, it’s time to make them do the job.

I didn’t put this on the top of the list, but our union represents home care workers, nursing home workers, developmentally disabled workers, and the government and society has depended on them for care as much as they do hospital workers, yet they are severely underpaid and under resourced.  Good health care is a top to bottom priority, and we have to guarantee our people that they will be provided for when in care, and when giving care.

Yes, people will finally learn to wash their hands better, but the virus ought to bring forward a host of changes that we desperately need and can no longer ignore.  The temptation by policy makers will be to fight the last war, rather than the next, by putting more respirators and masks into production.  Many of us will include different items in our “run for it” bags and storage closets for sure.  But we need to learn from this that there are fundamental changes that we have to make in protection and provision for our people, and we need to do it now.

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