Poverty Wages and Working Conditions for Care Givers are a Crisis

New Orleans   Think about these projections and facts.

Caregivers including home health aides, personal care attendants and certified nursing assistants according to government projections are going to continue to be among the fastest-growing occupations. The Labor Department estimates that a million jobs in this classification will be added in the decade that started in 2014 and will end in 2024.

OK, there is a certain amount of guessing there, but the message is solid. As people get older, weaker, and more impaired, they are going to need more help, and the helpers are the caregivers in these categories. Anyone who has spent time in a hospital or cared for a loved one or wrestled with the issues of older relatives and their needs, knows that their lives – and often our own – depend on them completely. The primary sitters for my almost 94 year old mother are like family. One is a constant at Thanksgiving. Another was a union steward for Local 100 for decades. They make my mother’s life possible, and, frankly, mine as well, because without their constancy and competence, how would I work and travel on my schedule? I couldn’t.

But, the facts are also that a quarter of all such caregivers live in poverty. It’s also a fact that forty percent leave these occupations entirely within a year. Our union represents nursing home workers in Louisiana along with other care workers in homes and facilities for the residents who are differently-abled mentally. As part of our contracts and labor law, we get regular employee lists. The turnover is amazing.

We recently settled contracts for four nursing homes in Shreveport. We organized and brought the homes under contract in the mid-1980s, when they were owned by a family in the area. When we first won the elections the workers were all paid minimum wage with no holidays, no vacations, no nothing. Our workers are quietly celebrating their new contract now. In right-to-work Louisiana almost 50 have joined the union in the several weeks since we reached agreement. Some workers will get raises of between $1000 and $2000 per year for full-time work. Why? We were able – with the companies agreement – to get the base rate for certified nursing assistants up to $10 per hour and increase the level of annual and biannual raises. The Shreveport-based homes had been bought by a Dallas-based company that had realized in this economy they couldn’t continue to hire people and keep the staffing ratios without agreeing to raise wages.

Will there still be turnover? Oh, yes! Will some of our members still live in poverty? Oh, yes! Does this fit in with mega-political issues at the state and federal level? Oh, mercy, yes! Insurance is offered to all of workers, but none can afford it at these wages. The state is in permanent financial crisis affecting the reimbursement rate for caregivers and in fact the power of the nursing home industry and lobbyists has retarded the growth of home health care aides. Federally, Republicans are still trying to figure out how to cutback on support for Medicaid and Medicare, which is the bulk of the reimbursement.

Eduardo Porter argues in the New York Times that these critical caregiving jobs have to offer a path to the middle class. He’s right on the money, but who is willing to pay the bills, even when lives depend on it?

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Residential Segregation and Upward Mobility

450New Orleans         Reports of a new study by economists Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, and Lawrence Katz looking more deeply at the earning records of millions of families who moved to different addresses found that “poor children who grow up in some cities and towns have sharply higher odds of escaping poverty than similar poor children elsewhere.”   As the New York Times summarized, “…the city is especially harsh for boys:  Low-income boys who grew up there in recent decades make roughly 25 percent less as adults than similar low-income boys who were born in the city and moved as small children to an average place.”

I’m scratching my head just a bit wondering what the news is, in all of this.  Are the headlines simply about the fact that rather than just thinking that families are being trapped in poverty in urban neighborhoods and a lot of rural areas and Indian reservations, that now that we have the numbers, we can prove they are trapped?

God knows we have been tricking ourselves, so maybe that’s the point.  Studies by several independent research teams have found that Americans severely misjudge the amount of upward mobility in society through a self-serving psychological conceit:  overestimating upward mobility is self-serving for the rich and justifies their wealth and for the poor provides hope for a brighter future.  Neither is true, but “what the hey!”

The map, county-to-county, is interesting.  You are in trouble living in Tampa, Orlando, West Palm, Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, and New Orleans for sure, and good luck if you live in the Bronx or some parts of Manhattan still.  You live on the Navaho, Northern Cheyenne, or other reservations, luck won’t help you.  The best shot for your family according to the numbers is DuPage County outside of Chicago, if you can afford the rent, and about the same can be said for San Francisco, Salt Lake City – and a whole lot of other places in Utah – Las Vegas, and Providence, as well as some of the suburban counties around them.  You might be able to afford the rent in Altoona and some parts of Pittsburgh.

Sadly for all of the Sunbelt boom, overall if you look at the map of the South your best shot outside of northwestern Arkansas is just getting by and holding your own.   South and North Carolina look like disaster areas or, I guess to be more specific, they look like the Mississippi Delta.  There’s nothing but trouble in all of this.

HUD Secretary Julian Castro says he’s excited about this.  He wants to allocate funding to help families move to higher cost neighborhoods with larger housing vouchers.  This will be an interesting appropriations battle when he goes with that budget to the Republican Congressmen from these suburban districts and asks for more money to move families from the ghetto to their counties.  For a long time residential income and racial segregation has been a concrete ceiling for poverty, and the numbers that prove it aren’t going to be enough to change the hearts and minds of politicians who are committed to no change coming to their areas and the same faces in their electorate.

You can’t have mobility when all the roads are filled with STOP signs.

“Dare You to Move” by Switchfoot – Poverty

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